Celebrating the Success of Dr. David B. Samadi on Prostate Cancer Surgery

On the pinnacle of success and time-proven when it comes to prostate cancer surgery and treatment is Dr. David Samadi. In his article on Huffing post, he describes the successful prostate cancer treatment of Mitt Romney, a former Republican Presidential Candidate. Dr. Samadi has termed Romney’s prognosis as good after he underwent surgery performed by Dr. Thomas Ahlering at UC Irvine Hospital in California.

According to Dr. David Samadi, if a person is diagnosed with prostate cancer, and it happens that cancer has not spread beyond the gland, he highly recommends surgery as opposed to radiation. The main reason is that research has shown prostate cancer patients get better with surgery than radiation treatment. In fact, patients treated by radiation have a 200% risk of dying from prostate cancer than those who have undergone surgery, and their life expectancy reduced by 150% compared to those who go for surgery. He adds that radiation exposes patients to secondary cancer such as rectal and bladder cancers as a result of possible side effects in that area of the body. Another disadvantage of radiation is that one cannot undergo surgery after undergoing treatment by radiation.

Dr. David Samadi is a urologic oncologist who is certified by the board and specializes in diagnosis and treatment of urologic related illnesses, cancer of the bladder and kidney as well as prostate cancer. He works at Lenox Hill Hospital where he serves as the chairman of Urology. He is among the few who are well trained in open surgery, laparoscopic robotic radical prostatectomy, and oncology, something that puts him in a firm place to create global awareness and attention of prostate cancer.

He is a decorated surgeon due to his 90% success rate of eliminating cancer from his patients. He uses a self-made treatment method called Samadi Modified Advanced Robotic Treatment (SMART).

Dr. David Samadi was born in Iran in 1964 in a Persian Jewish Community. Together with his brothers, they were forced to leave Iran following the Iranian Revolution in 1979 fleeing to Belgium without their parents. They were motivated to start a new life to help themselves realize their dreams and make their parents proud despite the hand of fate befalling them. In 1984 they relocated to the United States where Samadi went ahead to pursue a profession in medicine. He attended Stony Brook School of Medicine and later went to Montefiore Medical center for postgraduate training before completing an oncology fellowship in 2001 majoring in proctology.